Humanitarian Health Ethics is a place to find practical and educational material for humanitarian healthcare workers as well as students and scholars of humanitarian healthcare ethics. The website developed out of empirical research on the ethical dilemmas faced by humanitarian healthcare professionals working in humanitarian crises, disasters or areas of extreme poverty.

Recent Posts

New Article on Disaster and Disability

“Haitian and international responders’ and decision-makers’ perspectives regarding disability and the response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake” by Matthew R. Hunt, Ryoa Chung, Evelyne Durocher, and Jean Hugues Henrys.

Background: Following disasters, persons with disabilities (PWD) are especially vulnerable to harm, yet they have commonly been excluded from disaster planning, and their needs have been poorly addressed during disaster relief. Following the 2010 Haiti earthquake, thousands of individuals experienced acute injuries. Many more individuals with preexisting disabilities experienced heightened vulnerability related to considerations including safety, access to services, and meeting basic needs.

The Humanitarian Politics of Cecil the Lion

In case you missed it, in late July, Walter Palmer, a dentist from Minnesota, beheaded Cecil, a lion living in Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe. Indeed, the poaching of Cecil the lion was unfortunate. But the righteous expressions of moral high ground that accompanied media discussions lay bare some key issues around representations of Africa that warrant further attention. Public shaming of Mr. Palmer focused on outrage over his sense of Western entitlement that led him to disregard Zimbabwean laws to kill “Africa’s most beloved lion”. Ironically, these selective narratives play into the same power dynamics and sense of entitlement that they set out to critique.

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