0 comments on “A Canadian Medical Family’s Humanitarian Legacy”

A Canadian Medical Family’s Humanitarian Legacy

By Gautham Krishnaraj, for the Canadian Red Cross Blog

“Over 150 years ago, the Red Cross  Red Crescent Movement was born in the wake of the Battle of Solferino in 1859. Movement founder Henry Dunant was so moved by the immense suffering he saw that he called upon local villagers to come to the aid of the wounded. Among those who responded to the call were the Women of Castiglione, countless European medical professionals and Norman Bethune – a Canadian surgeon from Ontario. Dunant himself spoke of Bethune in A Memory of Solferino, recognizing him by name as “Norman Bettun”.

Nearly a century later, Bethune’s grandson – also named Norman – would follow in his grandfather’s footsteps, playing a critical role in the 1938 Sino (Chinese)-Japanese War. The younger Bethune was an established surgeon, having invented more than a dozen surgical devices, including the Bethune Rib Shears which are used to this day. During the 1936 Spanish Civil War, Bethune organized one of the first mobile blood transfusion services. He later travelled to China with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) to lead a Canadian-American medical team during the Sino-Japanese War. He wore his Red Cross badge with pride, performing surgeries on the frontline to casualties on both sides of the conflict, as countless Red Cross surgeons continue to do to this day.”

Read more about the Bethune family and their contributions to humanitarian health care through the decades here: http://www.redcross.ca/blog/2018/8/a-family-on-the-frontlines—celebrating-norman-bethune

Reposted from original blog with permission of the author.

 

0 comments on “McMaster Global Health Speaker Series to Feature HHE’s Dr. Lisa Schwartz”

McMaster Global Health Speaker Series to Feature HHE’s Dr. Lisa Schwartz

Thursday, December 6, 2018
Dr. Lisa Schwartz
Arnold L. Johnson Chair, Health Care Ethics; Professor, Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact, McMaster University
“Ethics, Obstacles and Palliative Care in Humanitarian Settings”
MDCL 3020 – 4:30-6:30PM

Other speakers and dates:

Monday October 22, 2018
Dr. Govindakarnavar Arunkumar 

Professor & Head, Nodal Officer (Influenza Lab), Manipal Centre for Virus Research, Manipal Academy of Higher Education
“Nipah Virus: An Emerging Pandemic”
MDCL 3020 – 4:30-6:30PM

Thursday November 22, 2018
Dr. Stuart MacLeod
Professor Emeritus, Pediatrics, University of British Columbia
“New Approaches to Improving Therapeutic Choices for Children: A Global Health Priority”
MDCL 3020 – 4:30-6:30PM

For more information visit: https://globalhealth.mcmaster.ca/news-and-events/events-opportunities
0 comments on “Upcoming Event: September 26”

Upcoming Event: September 26

Evening_Poster_final

Small Humanitarian Acts that Make All the Difference in End of Life Care?
Evening Panel Discussion  |  18:30-20:30  | Maison de la paix
 
            Introductory remarks—

 

18:30-18:40
Dorschopper-doris2017_300x300is Schopper
 
Dr. Schopper is professor at the medical faculty of the University of Geneva and director of CERAH since July 2011.Trained as a medical doctor,Schopper spent several years with Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in the field. She was president of the Swiss branch of MSF and twice president of the MSF International Council. In 2001 Doris Schopper was asked to constitute an Ethics Review Board for MSF International. Since then she has chaired the Board coordinating the ethical review of MSF research proposals and providing advice on ethical matters to the organisation. httpslisa_preferred-photo-edited-e1430944033295://www.cerahgeneve.ch/cerah/faculty-staff/academics/prof-doris-schopper
 
 18:40-18:55
Lisa Schwartz
 
Prof. Schwartz is the Arnold L. Johnson Chair in Health Care Ethics with the Faculty of Health Sciences, Associate Professor in the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Associate Director of the Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA), and Associate Member of the Department of Philosophy, at McMaster University. Dr Schwartz is trained as a Clinical Ethics Consultant and has used and devised frameworks for the ethical challenges that arise in clinical care in high and low resource settings and in humanitarian crises settings. https://humanitarianhealthethics.net/home/about/lisa-schwartz/

 

 18:55-19:00 – Doris Shopper’s introduction of the keynote speaker
 
            Keynote message—19:00-19:20 (+5 mins of clarification questions)
 
Paul Bouvier on Small Acts of Humanitarian Kindness

12-11-china-help-course-paul-bouvier-1

 Dr. Bouvier works with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) as course coordinator (the HELP course)and chair of the group on ethics in the practice of humanitarian action. Former ICRC Senior Medical Advisor, he is a medical doctor with specialization in pediatrics and public health, and Associate Lecturer at the Institute of Global Health, University of Geneva, where he has carried out research and prevention programs on child sexual abuse and violence. Along with his medical and training activities, Dr. Bouvier has also applied the perspectives he developed through his various roles and field experience in crises into various philosophical reflection and medical humanities activities. From published reflections on “small things and humanity” on the part of delegates visiting people in detention (2012), to an art history lesson on Francisco Goya’s Disasters of War prints in prefiguring Dunant’s Solferino relief efforts by several decades (2011), Dr. Bouvier has demonstrated his skills as a rich and diverse thinker on issues of suffering, morality and what it means to be human. A further complement to his professional work, and his intellectual writing, he has consulted on exhibitions at the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum<https://www.redcrossmuseum.ch/en> in Geneva including the main “Humanitarian Adventure” halls, and the most recent publication “Prisoners’ Objects<https://www.redcrossmuseum.ch/en/product/prisoners-objects/>.”
 
 
 19:25-19:30Schwartz introduces the panelists
 
 

 

           Panelists—19:30-20:15
 
0-2Ibraheem Abu Siam
 
Abu Siam, RN, CNS, is a Public Health Officer at UNHCR (Jordan). He is an experienced Public Health Specialist with a demonstrated history of working in the international affairs industry. Skilled in Policy Analysis, Government, Program Evaluation, Public Policy, and Research, he is a dedicated community and social services professional with a Master’s degree focused in Public Health/Community Nursing from Jordan University for Science and Technology. You can see him here on a video from the International Council of Nurses speak on the topic of safeguarding health during crises: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFY8yHd_i_E
 
Emmanuel Musoni 
 
emmanuel_musoni-e1528994510848Dr. Musoni is a Psychiatrist at the Central Hospital of the University of Rwanda in Kigali (CHUK). Before starting his postgraduate studies in psychiatry, Dr. Musoni was the Clinical Director at the Masaka District Hospital, Rwanda. He also served as a Medical Officer in Darfur-North SUDAN for the UNAMID Peacekeeping mission. His research interests include bipolar disorders and palliative care. He is currently carrying out research on the effects and challenges of psychoeducation on patients with bipolar disorder in Rwanda. https://humanitarianhealthethics.net/home/research/hhe-research-studies/pall-iphc/case-study-conflict-protracted-refugees-rwanda/
 
 
Sonya_De_Laat2-2Sonya de Laat
 
Dr. de Laat is the Postdoctoral Fellow in Humanitarian Health Ethics at McMaster University, Canada. With backgrounds in anthropology and media studies, her interests and approaches are mixed and multidisciplinary—straddling social science, health science and humanities. Her research interests include the moral, political and historical dimensions of humanitarian visual culture. Currently, she is focusing on the role of photography in shaping people’s impressions of and in mediating responses to global migration, with a particular focus on the conditions and experiences of being a refugee, and on humanitarian (health)care for refugees. www.sonyadelaat.weebly.com
 
olive205-e1520279214382Olive Wahoush
 
Dr. Wahoush has been an advocate and researcher of refugee health care since 1987. She came to this topic through teaching undergraduate nurses maternal newborn health in a refugee camp in Jordan and through hospital administration and volunteer roles in Pakistan and Canada. Through her roles at the School of Nursing at McMaster University, Dr. Wahoush was instrumental is leading and promoting research with refugees, newcomers and other underserved populations. Recent research Dr. Wahoush has been involved in or leading include studies focused on reproductive health, health and resettlement of refugees and refugee-like families in Canada and exploring the selection process for refugees in transit countries like Jordan.
 
20:15-10:30  Schopper & Schwartz closing remarks
0 comments on “Featured publication”

Featured publication

From the publisher:

“Humanitarian Action Ethics explores the ethical dilemmas at the heart of humanitarian action in the 21st century, turning theory into practice for enabling effective change.

  • The most comprehensive and up-to-date work on humanitarian ethics currently available.
  • Brings together contributions from humanitarian and health professionals, philosophers and social/political scientists, covering a wide range of countries and addressing the most pressing concerns facing modern humanitarian work.
  • Goes beyond the theoretical to consider how such ethical concerns might inform more effective practical approaches to humanitarianism.
  • Subjects covered include volunteer tourism, gender-based violence, the effects of globalization and highly politicized aid environments.”

Contributions from HHERG and HumEthNet Members:
Matthew Hunt and Jingru Miao explored “Moral Entanglement and the Ethics of Closing Humanitarian Projects”.

Rachel Kiddell-Monroe and her colleagues discussed “Humanitarian Ethics in Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders”.

John Pringle and Toby Leon Moorsom reflected on “An Ethic of Refusal: The Political Economy of Humanitarianism Under Neoliberal Globalisation”.

Together the contributions in this publication inform how new perspective on humanitarian ethics can enhance humanitarian action.

Receive 30% off your purchase of this book with the code ACTIONETHICS at the following link: https://www.zedbooks.net/shop/book/humanitarian-action-and-ethics/

0 comments on “In Focus: Paul Bouvier”

In Focus: Paul Bouvier

Paul Bouvier is working with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) as the coordinator of the HELP course – Health Emergencies in Large Populations – and chair of the group on ethics in the practice of humanitarian action. The former ICRC Senior Medical Advisor, he is a medical doctor with specialization in pediatrics and public health, and Associate Lecturer at the Institute of Global Health, University of Geneva, where he has carried out research and prevention programs on child sexual abuse and violence. His work at the ICRC focuses on ethical issues in humanitarian action and training humanitarian professionals worldwide in public health and ethics to respond to humanitarian crises.

Along with his medical and training activities, Dr. Bouvier has also applied the perspectives he developed through his various roles and field experience in crises into various philosophical reflection and medical humanities activities. From published reflections on “small things and humanity” on the part of delegates visiting people in detention (2012), to an art history lesson on Francisco Goya’s Disasters of War prints in prefiguring Dunant’s Solferino relief efforts by several decades (2011), Dr. Bouvier has demonstrated his skills as a rich and diverse thinker on issues of suffering, morality and what it means to be human. A further complement to his professional work, and his intellectual writing, he has consulted on exhibitions at the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum<https://www.redcrossmuseum.ch/en> in Geneva including the main “Humanitarian Adventure” halls, and the most recent publication “Prisoners’ Objects<https://www.redcrossmuseum.ch/en/product/prisoners-objects/>.”

When considering the shaping of a new generation of humanitarian actors, Dr. Bouvier stresses the importance of developing literacy and practical skills in ethics, to improve decision making in the field. Humanitarian actors, he explains, have lived with the idea that their activities responded in the best possible ways, to their high ethical aims. Some start to realize that in front of complex situations and dilemmas, bearing strong humanitarian values, principles and good will is not enough. We are faced in the field with very challenging, sometimes tragic situations; we have to make very difficult choices, with limited time and resources in front of high needs, and major operational obstacles, including violence and security threats. In order to make ethical decisions in such circumstances we need to recognize and analyze the ethical dimensions and bearings of our decions; and to initiate and ethical deliberation in our teams and institutions, in order to support the decision. This is the task of practical ethics, or practical wisdom in the field.

The humanitarian sector is still far away from such ethical good practice. Ethics in humanitarian action is taken for granted, Dr Bouvier says. A striking example is given by a recent report from an influential think-tank, on operational decision-making in humanitarian response. The review provides interesting analysis of decision-making procedures and protocols, and more informal ways to intuitive, improvised or makeshift decisions, it does not, however, mention the ethical dimensions of difficult decisions in the field: ethics still seems to be implicit and present in all our activity; or perhaps is it conceived as a separate field, for the specialist philosopher and ethicists? either ways, our experience shows that this attitude leads to ethical tensions, sometimes leading to crises, at individual or group level, and when ethical drifts or errors do occur, they represent a major risk for the staff and team in the field, and the institution as a whole. Yet, this risk is still overlooked and ignored.

In order to respond to these needs, training in practical ethics is essential. In 2008, a workshop on practical ethics in humanitarian action was introduced in the ICRC staff integration course, followed by the HELP courses. Since then, the learning approach has been simillar, starting with group sharing and reflection on ethical challenges experienced by participants in their own professional activity. Then the group would choose one case to share with all. This case would be analyzed following a process of ethical analysis and decision-making, before summarizing ethical values and principles in humanitarian action, and the process of ethical decision-making. This approach, starting from situations brought by the participants, proved to be very successful in very different contexts, with different ethical background and traditions, including Switzerland, Qatar, China, Mexico, Kenya, Cuba, Iran, Lebanon, Benin, and the USA.

Based on this fruitful experience, the HELP course recently introduced the Humanitarian Health Ethics Analysis Tool – HHEAT – and used cases from the HHE collection. This approach proves to be also very successful. Key success factors of the HHEAT approach is that, firstly, the cases from the collection bring ethical difficult decisions from the field; secondly, it invites the participants to reflect by their own, to share their reflection in group, and open a deliberation with others, in order to reach a decision; and, most importantly, it does not propose a solution to the case, so leaving a space for reflection and sharing experience. This approach of practical ethics certainly needs skills, experience, and time also, in facilitating the sessions. Managing these learning sessions obviously need strong background on practical ethics, with clear understanding of humanitarian ethical values and principles, as well as good knowledge of, and openness to other cultures and ethical traditions, combined with a clear view of ethical duties and absolute limits, across cultures, notably in front of extreme violence.

Using the HHEAT cases and tool, Dr Bouvier concludes, has some advantages in this respect, from the fact that they wre developed in the context of an international collaboration between academic and humanitarian institutions, in which the ICRC took part. This initiative is deemed to play a very active role in developing ând promoting practical ethics in humanitarian action. The scope of this approach should not be limited to health care, Dr Bouvier suggests, but will very soon expand to the other dimensions of the humanitarian response, including assistance and protection.

[Sources: http://www.icpcn.org/joan-marston/, and personal communication]

0 comments on “Autumn issue of REFLECTIONS: latest edition”

Autumn issue of REFLECTIONS: latest edition

The latest edition of the HumEthNet newsletter is now available.

Theme: Ethics training and support for humanitarian practitioners and researchers

In this issue:
– Humanitarian Health Ethics E-module
– In Focus: Paul Bouvier
– Humanitarian Health Ethics Analysis Tool (HHEAT)
– Research in Humanitarian Crises: Resources for Research Ethics Committees
– Case Study in Humanitarian Research Ethics
– Featured Publication
– Additional resources on ethics in humanitarian health research
Reflections editors:
Sonya de Laat & Jhalok Talukdar
Our email address is:
humethnet@gmail.com

 

Our mailing address is:
Humanitarian Health Ethics Research Group
McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., CRL-202
Hamilton, On, Canada L8S 4K1

                      

0 comments on “What ethical issues arise in outbreaks and pandemics?”

What ethical issues arise in outbreaks and pandemics?

Check out this World Health Organization site containing some valuable resources and points of reflection on ethical issues arising during public health outbreaks and pandemics.

Consider exploring some of the questions coming out of that site through Case Studies or by applying the Humanitarian Health Ethics Research Tool (HHEAT).

We look forward to hearing your thought! Contact us here.

Cut and paste the WHO site in your browser: http://www.who.int/ethics/topics/outbreaks-emergencies/en/