Mark your calendars

Canadian Humanitarian Conference 2016 Following on the successes of the 2014 and 2013 conferences, the third edition of the Canadian Humanitarian Conference promises to continue strengthening relationships and efforts to help us before, during and after humanitarian crises. Dates: October 6…

The Rising Humanitarian Tide

by John Pringle (version français à la suite) “Every ship is unsinkable, until it sinks” (Crawley, 2010). So it is with human rights: inviolable until they are denied. The right to protection from war, the right to maritime rescue, the right to…

Autumn edition of Reflections newsletter now available!

Check out the latest edition of the Reflections newsletter and archives of past issues. In the Autumn edition: HumEthNet member Stephanie Nixon is profiled In Focus; Maria Berghs provides a provocative commentary on "Disability and humanitarian healthcare ethics"; A rich collection of new…

ALNAP releases SOHS 2015.

Every three years ALNAP releases a State of the Humanitarian System (SOHS) report that looks back at humanitarian assistance over that time period with a goal of responding to the question: How well is humanitarian assistance performing? Commissioned by ALNAP and authored…

From ‘suffering others’ to ‘aspiring mothers’: the contemporary image world of global maternal health campaigns

Maternal mortality was once described as the neglected tragedy of global health. Though it was estimated in the 1980s that nearly half a million women died each year from pregnancy and birth related causes – 99% of them in the global south – little attention was paid and little progress was made for many years. Recently, however, the problem of maternal mortality has become somewhat of a cause célèbre attracting the attention of world leaders, billionaire philanthropists, celebrity journalists, and filmmakers.

New Article on Disaster and Disability

"Haitian and international responders’ and decision-makers’ perspectives regarding disability and the response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake" by Matthew R. Hunt, Ryoa Chung, Evelyne Durocher, and Jean Hugues Henrys. Background: Following disasters, persons with disabilities (PWD) are especially vulnerable to harm, yet they have commonly been excluded from disaster planning, and their needs have been poorly addressed during disaster relief. Following the 2010 Haiti earthquake, thousands of individuals experienced acute injuries. Many more individuals with preexisting disabilities experienced heightened vulnerability related to considerations including safety, access to services, and meeting basic needs.

The Humanitarian Politics of Cecil the Lion

In case you missed it, in late July, Walter Palmer, a dentist from Minnesota, beheaded Cecil, a lion living in Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe. Indeed, the poaching of Cecil the lion was unfortunate. But the righteous expressions of moral high ground that accompanied media discussions lay bare some key issues around representations of Africa that warrant further attention. Public shaming of Mr. Palmer focused on outrage over his sense of Western entitlement that led him to disregard Zimbabwean laws to kill “Africa's most beloved lion”. Ironically, these selective narratives play into the same power dynamics and sense of entitlement that they set out to critique.