Participants Wanted!

Research in disasters is thought to lead to improvements in disaster relief and better understanding of how disasters impact populations. Recent emphasis on disaster research has spurred expanded discussion regarding the ethical implications of this field of inquiry. We are conducting a new study, entitled Investigating Researchers’ Experience of Ethics in Post-Disaster Research, to investigate the kinds of ethical issues faced by researchers operating in post-disaster settings, and the extent to which current resources, such as ethics guidelines, appropriately address those issues.

Case Study: Co-opting of Aid Organizations

An international medical NGO is staffing a health clinic in a remote village located near a large-scale agriculture enterprise operated by a multinational corporation. Many of the clinic’s patients are migrant workers who have come to the region seeking work at the commercial farm. Employees receive low wages by local standards, work very long hours, and have poor living conditions. Many of the workers and their family members present to the clinic with signs of malnutrition. A number of them also report respiratory complaints and skin and eye problems, which they associate with their handling of pesticides on the large farm.

World Health Assembly’s Recent Look at Health Care Under Attack

by Kacper Niburski, HumEthNet contributor

Health can bridge the political. At its core, it is a fundamental cry of the humanity in all of us. Disease does not discriminate nor does sickness pledge partisanships. Only we do.

The sixty-seventh World Health Assembly, housed by the WHO and the United Nations Foundation, focused on this mutual, worldwide aspiration for health as both a governmental tool and an individual right. Attended by delegates from all WHO member states, the conference housed technical briefings, debates, and discussions surrounding global health issues like nutrition, universal health coverage, patient’s rights, and non-communicable diseases.

Health Care Under Attack: A Call for Action

Attacks on healthcare workers and facilities are increasing, in both conflict and non-conflict settings. The targeting of healthcare workers and facilities has grave consequences for the delivery of care and the right to health in such settings. Join a live-streaming event on Wednesday, 21 May 2014

Nicaraguan Perceptions of Humanitarian Healthcare Missions

Ethics Grand Rounds

Title: Nicaraguan Perceptions of Humanitarian Healthcare Missions
Speaker: Elysée Nouvet
Date: Wednesday, 14 May 2014
Time: 12:00-1:00 pm
Location: McMaster University Medical Centre 4E20

Complicity, Entaglement and Being Implicated: The Double Effect of Humanitarian Healthcare Practice

by Lisa Schwartz

On the 4th and 5th of November 2013, Paul Bouvier of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and Nicolas Tavaglione of the University of Geneva hosted a symposium called “From humanity to complicity? Ethical duties and dilemmas of humanitarian action in wars and armed conflicts” at the Fondation Brocher, in Hermance, Geneva, Switzerland. Those gathered included philosophers and legal scholars, and members of the ICRC and MSF. It was a productive mix of scholars, practitioners and policy makers that created a welcome space for discussion of ethical theories of complicity in humanitarian healthcare practice.