Health Care Under Attack: A Call for Action

Attacks on healthcare workers and facilities are increasing, in both conflict and non-conflict settings. The targeting of healthcare workers and facilities has grave consequences for the delivery of care and the right to health in such settings. Join a live-streaming…

Complicity, Entaglement and Being Implicated: The Double Effect of Humanitarian Healthcare Practice

by Lisa Schwartz On the 4th and 5th of November 2013, Paul Bouvier of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and Nicolas Tavaglione of the University of Geneva hosted a symposium called "From humanity to complicity? Ethical duties…

Dr. Lynda Redwood-Campbell Takes Part in Typhoon Haiyan Relief Efforts

In November 2013 typhoon Haiyan devastated portions of Southeast Asia, leaving more than six thousand people dead and millions displaced. Humanitarian Healthcare Ethics (hhe) colleague and Hamilton physician,  Dr. Lynda Redwood-Campbell, took part in relief efforts at a Canada Red…

Photography in Vanishing Landscape: An Interview with Yazan Khalili

A landscape is not on the verge of collapse, unless a vanishing landscape is a collapsing one. I came to this realization during my fieldwork in Palestine (2012), when I spent a year travelling between different cities and landscapes. I was trying to capture the visual presence and absence of the separation wall in Palestine and how The Wall’s presence and absence was mirrored in Israeli national discourse. I interviewed several Palestinian and Israeli photographers and artists, but was particularly struck by the photographic work of Palestinian artist Yazan Khalili. My interview with Yazan Khalili brought to the surface the visual dilemmas of a catastrophic monument, or as he puts it, “can we resist The Wall by photographing it, or should we resist the photograph framing it?”

‘Choose what moves you’: Checkered Landscapes of Care (Un)checked by Red Cross Campaign?

It's Giving Tuesday 2013. Following Black Friday and Cyber Monday, Giving Tuesday asks consumers to make meaningful gifts. I sift through my Inbox: 'Choose What Moves You'. It is an invitation from the Canadian Red Cross to: “take part in Canada’s first national day dedicated to giving and thinking about others in need.” Charities have long played on our emotions and senses of right and wrong. Here was a slightly different campaign—one that was inviting us as Canadians to render what might otherwise be a subconscious motivator for giving —affect—into the conscious basis for giving.