The Rising Humanitarian Tide

by John Pringle (version français à la suite) “Every ship is unsinkable, until it sinks” (Crawley, 2010). So it is with human rights: inviolable until they are denied. The right to protection from war, the right to maritime rescue, the right to…

Autumn edition of Reflections newsletter now available!

Check out the latest edition of the Reflections newsletter and archives of past issues. In the Autumn edition: HumEthNet member Stephanie Nixon is profiled In Focus; Maria Berghs provides a provocative commentary on "Disability and humanitarian healthcare ethics"; A rich collection of new…

ALNAP releases SOHS 2015.

Every three years ALNAP releases a State of the Humanitarian System (SOHS) report that looks back at humanitarian assistance over that time period with a goal of responding to the question: How well is humanitarian assistance performing? Commissioned by ALNAP and authored…

New Article on Disaster and Disability

"Haitian and international responders’ and decision-makers’ perspectives regarding disability and the response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake" by Matthew R. Hunt, Ryoa Chung, Evelyne Durocher, and Jean Hugues Henrys. Background: Following disasters, persons with disabilities (PWD) are especially vulnerable to harm, yet they have commonly been excluded from disaster planning, and their needs have been poorly addressed during disaster relief. Following the 2010 Haiti earthquake, thousands of individuals experienced acute injuries. Many more individuals with preexisting disabilities experienced heightened vulnerability related to considerations including safety, access to services, and meeting basic needs.

Healthcare for Undocumented Migrants – Geneva, Oct. 2015

A timely event of interest to many HumEthNet members. From Medical Anthropology Switzerland (MAS), a one-day colloquium with providers' and migrants'  perspectives on the provision of healthcare for [undocumented] migrants. Colloquium event: October 10, 2015          Registration…

New Case in the ENHA Case Study Series

Case studies are made available for a variety of training and reflection purposes. They can be used in conjunction with the Humanitarian Health Ethics Analysis Tool (HHEAT) or on their own. Patient Transfer During Period of Heightened Security Threat Setting: A field…

New Case Study Available

Are injections better than pills? Two months ago, an international medical NGO established a project to support local health clinics and introduce a new malaria treatment program that consists of taking two pills once a day for three days. It would replace the currently available treatment of daily injections. Local health professionals are hesitant about the change in treatment protocol when it is presented to them. The local community, including some local health workers, voice their concern about this treatment; in their opinion injections are better than pills, and more pills are better than a few. Some local health workers are also sceptical that this new treatment regimen will be available once the non-governmental organization leaves the area. What’s more, community health workers have heard that some local health providers have discouraged patients from accepting the new treatment.