Webinar: New WHO guidelines on ethical issues in public health surveillance

Seminario virtual: Nuevas pautas de OMS sobre ética en la vigilancia de la salud pública –notar enlace para la sesión corregido (AHORA SÍ)
 
La OPS lo invita a un seminario virtual para presentar estas pautas, recientemente publicadas por OMS, que constituyen el primer marco internacional para dar orientación ética en los temas de vigilancia en la salud pública. El seminario contará con presentaciones de la Dr. Amy Fairchild (Profesora de la Escuela Mailman de Salud Pública de la Universidad de Columbia y actualmente también Decana Asociada de Asuntos Académicos de Texas A&M) y el Dr. Michael Selgelid (Director del Centro de Bioética de la Universidad de Monash). Ambos trabajaron en el desarrollo de las pautas y representan a Centros Colaboradores de Bioética de la OPS/OMS.
El seminario virtual se llevará a cabo el 21 de noviembre de 3:00 a 4:30 pm (hora de Washington DC) y será en inglés. Para participar siga este enlace: https://paho.webex.com/paho/onstage/g.php?MTID=e4df9a57d1be734860c8eea47e91646aa
Las pautas están disponibles en inglés en: http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/255721/1/9789241512657-eng.pdf?ua=1. La OPS próximamente publicará las pautas en español.
Para recibir más información sobre temas de ética de la salud pública, suscríbase por medio de este hiperlink a la lista de OPS Public Health Ethics .                                     
 
 
Webinar: New WHO guidelines on ethical issues in public health surveillance –note NOW corrected link for session
 
PAHO invites you to a webinar to present these guidelines, recently published by WHO, which are the first international framework to provide ethics guidance on issues in public health surveillance. Dr. Amy Fairchild (Professor at Columbia Univeristy Mailman School of Public Health, currently serving as Associate Dean of Academic Affairs at Texas A&M) and Dr. Michael Selgelid (Director of Monash University’s Bioethics Center) will present the guidelines. Both participated in their development and represent Bioethics Collaborating Centers of PAHO/WHO.
The webinar will take place on November 21st from 3:00 to 4:30 pm (Washington DC time) and will be conducted in English. To participate follow this link: https://paho.webex.com/paho/onstage/g.php?MTID=e4df9a57d1be734860c8eea47e91646aa  
The guidelines are available (in English) at: http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/255721/1/9789241512657-eng.pdf?ua=1. PAHO will soon publish them in Spanish.
To receive more information on public health ethics topics, subscribe through this hyperlink to PAHO’s listserv Public Health Ethics .                                           
 
 
Suscripción a lista InvestigaciónÉTICA                                       Subscription to list InvestigaciónÉTICA                                             
Programa Regional de Bioética                                                   Regional Program on Bioethics                                                         
www.paho.org/bioetica                                                                www.paho.org/bioethics                                                                                       
Gestión del Conocimiento, Bioética e Investigación                    Knowledge Management, Bioethics and Research                                       
Organización Panamericana de la Salud                                      Pan American Health Organization       

Obstacles and moral experiences with palliative care provision in humanitarian crises…

From September 17-19, Kevin Bezanson represented the Humanitarian Health Ethics research group at the 5th International Public Health and Palliative Care Conference held in Ottawa, ON.

Here is the PDF version of the poster entitled –

Health professionals’ lived experiences of palliative care provision in humanitarian crisis: Moral experiences confronting the suffering of patients who are dying or likely to die in settings of war, disaster, or epidemic.

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Kevin Bezanson presenting the HHE poster at the 5th International Public Health and Palliative Care Conference, Ottawa, ON, Sept. 17-19, 2017.

 

The poster is based on ongoing research for a R2HC funded project entitled:

Aid when there is ‘nothing left to offer’: A study of ethics and palliative care during international humanitarian action


The research project is funded by Elrha’s Research for Health in Humanitarian Crises (R2HC) Programme. The Research for Health in Humanitarian Crises (R2HC) programme aims to improve health outcomes by strengthening the evidence base for public health interventions in humanitarian crises. Visit www.elrha.org/work/r2hc for more information. The R2HC programme is funded equally by the Wellcome Trust and DFID, with Elrha overseeing the programme’s execution and management.

Resisting Borders, 9-11 October 2017

CLICK HERE FOR THE CONFERENCE PROGRAM

Refugees and many migrants suffer from limits on their abilities to move around the world, even in pressing or urgent circumstances. They are often forced to leave their homes for reasons beyond their control, including war and civil unrest, political and religious persecution, economics, or famine and other natural or man-made disasters. Once displaced, whether internally or externally, they face pressing needs for food, water, shelter, and health care. Local governments, international agencies and non-governmental organizations often struggle with providing for their needs, particularly in resource-poor regions of the world. Recent socio-political changes in the United States, Western Europe and elsewhere have placed additional restrictions on the rights of migrants and refugees.

In solidarity with these refugees and migrants, we are hosting a no-travel virtual conference to explore the ethical, legal, philosophical, and social issues associated with refugee and migrant health in a world of economic, geopolitical, and psychological borders.

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Location: Online (no travel)

Cost: Free

For registration and other information: http://www.resistingborders.com

MARCH 31 CFP: Chapter contributions for volume on Humanitarian Action and Ethics

Humanitarian actors are now pressed to respond to increasingly complex crises in diverse and difficult contexts. Historically subject to multiple and often divergent interpretations, humanitarian values are now further challenged by changing conflict dynamics, globalization and its effect on shifting power relations, and a more sustained criticism of established forms of humanitarian response. Though under appreciated, ethical reflection offers an opportunity for deeper evaluation of humanitarian action, and its impact on those who endeavour to alleviate suffering and protect human dignity during, and in the aftermath of, humanitarian crises. This edited volume seeks to bring together academics and practitioners engaged in all aspects of both direct humanitarian response and scholarly humanitarian reflection, with the aim of offering a nuanced insight into the complexity of the humanitarian experience in a diversity of crisis contexts. As such, we welcome contributions related to any aspect of humanitarian action and ethics, with a particular interest in practitioner perspectives.

Call for Papers:

The volume is due to be submitted in its entirety by the 1st of August 2017. To be considered for inclusion in this volume, please kindly submit a 200-word abstract by the 31st of March to a.ahmad@ucl.ac.uk

Dr Ayesha Ahmad and Dr James Smith

Not to be missed! Two incredible upcoming talks hosted by McMaster History of Medicine

Title:  “The Drowned, the Saved, and the Forgotten: Genocide Survivors and the Foundations of Modern Humanitarianism” 

Speaker:   Dr. Keith Watenpaugh, Professor and Director, Human Rights Studies Program, Co-Director University of California Human Rights Collaboration, Department of Religious Studies, University of California at Davis

The talk will take place:

  • Wednesday, March 22, 2017
  • 3:00pm to 5:00pm
  • Health Sciences Building/McMaster Medical Centre (HSC) 1A6

Abstract:  All humanitarian emergencies are not created equal, or at least not constructed in the humanitarian imagination equally.  Where they happen, who is affected, the judged “worthiness” of victims and the quality of need are among the several conditions that transform how a problem of humanity becomes a problem for humanity, like genocide.  Examining the international humanitarian response to the genocide of the Ottoman Armenians (1915-1922), he argues that modern humanitarianism and genocide have a complex and intertwined history that has particular relevance to concepts like humanitarian neutrality, humanitarian governance and the role of justice in relief and what would be called now, rights-based development.

Biography:  Professor Keith David Watenpaugh studies the history, theory and practice of human rights and humanitarianism and directs the UC Davis Human Rights Studies Program. He is author of Bread From Stones: The Middle East and the Making of Modern Humanitarianism (California, 2015) and Being Modern in the Middle East (Princeton, 2006). His work has been translated into French, German, Armenian, Arabic, Turkish and Persian.

 

 

Title:  “Refugees, Human Rights, and the Syrian War” 

Speaker:   Dr. Keith Watenpaugh, Professor and Director, Human Rights Studies Program, Co-Director University of California Human Rights Collaboration, Department of Religious Studies, University of California at Davis

The talk will take place:

  • Wednesday, March 22, 2017
  • 7:30pm to 9:00pm
  • Health Sciences Building/McMaster Medical Centre (HSC) 1A1

Abstract:  With several years of fieldwork in Syria and the Middle East, Dr. Watenpaugh will trace a history of the conflict in Syria and an understanding of the situation of Syrian refugees.  He has worked with Syrian refugees in camps in Turkey and will provide some insights for health professionals working with these populations.  He will explore the legal dilemmas of global humanitarianism and will address the recent ban on Muslims and refugees in the United States.

These two talks are co-sponsored by the following:

Department of History , Orphan Sponsorship Program, McMaster Muslim Student Association,  Department of Health, Aging, Society, Humanitarian Healthcare Network, Department of Religious Studies

The History of Medicine and Medical Humanities Speaker Series is made possible by an endowment from Associated Medical Services (AMS).

For more information; please contact the Hannah Chair Dr. Ellen Amster at:  amstere@mcmaster.ca.

Call for Papers (April 15th): Resisting Borders – A Virtual Conference on Refugee and Migrant Health, Mobility, Human Rights and Responsibilities

Refugees and many migrants have long suffered under constraints on their mobility, even in pressing or urgent circumstances. They are often forced to leave their homes for reasons beyond their control, including war and civil unrest, political and religious persecution, economics, or famine and other natural or man-made disasters. Once displaced, whether internally or externally, they may face pressing needs for food, water, shelter, and health care. To explore these and other overlapping issues, in solidarity with these refugees and migrants we are hosting a no-travel virtual conference to explore the following questions:

 What kinds of restrictions on movement and travel of refugees are ethically permissible and which are not? When if ever are such restrictions ethically justifiable for refugees with needs for health services?

 Greater acceptance and humanitarian support is presented as being in tension with greater concerns for security, but how does this tension play out empirically and philosophically?

 What are the implications of ethically justified and unjustified restrictions? For example, in what ways do they create or perpetuate inequities?

 What is the proper moral response of and toward states that opt to provide acceptance and support versus those that opt for restrictions on refugees and migrants?

 

 Are there lessons from history that can shine light on the ethical dimensions and significance of mobility restrictions on refugees and migrants, and on fitting moral responses?

… and many other critical areas of inquiry.

We are especially interested in contributions from scholars and practitioners working in the areas of refugee health and/or international humanitarian law, immigration and security, health law and policy. Submissions from those who come from or work in regions facing travel restrictions are especially encouraged.

Interested participants should submit an abstract of 250 words no later than Saturday, April 15th, 2017. Abstracts should be submitted via email to the Organizing Chairs at info@resistingborders.com.

All abstracts should be in Word or RTF formats and contain the following information: a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) type of presentation (oral paper or panel presentation), and g) 3 keywords.

Panel presentations should consist of three to four abstracts organized around a central topic of direct relevance to the conference theme. Please use a plain sans serif 12-point font and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). More information will be forthcoming at http://resistingborders.com

TALK: Corpses and Places: Remaking World and Afterworld in a Camp for Displaced Persons Elizabeth Dunn

Corpses and Places: Remaking World and Afterworld in a Camp for Displaced Persons

Date: Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Time: 3:30-5:00 pm

Location: Degroote School of Business, Room 505

Abstract: For refugees and internally displaced people (IDPs), displacement is more than a technical problem of logistics and delivery, and more than just a problem of maintaining biological existence.  It is an existential dilemma posed by the destruction not only of their homes, but of the world they once knew, including many of their social relationships, their attachments to places and the structures and practices they used to create meaning. In this talk, I look at how IDPs in the Republic of Georgia create topolgangers—two very different and distinct places on the identical terrain—to recreate the villages they lost on the grounds of the camp.   In doing so, they begin to reconstitute the world as a comprehensible space where action has meaning.

Biography: Elizabeth Dunn is a trained anthropologist and currently an associate professor cross-appointed in geography and international studies at Indiana University.  In addition to numerous academic articles and books on post-socialist privatization and questions of public health after communism, she has written on aid, humanitarianism, and refugee policy for Science, Boston Reviewand Slate, and this research has also been featured in The Los Angeles Times, Die Zeit, and SINC, a Spanish news agency.  More information can be found at http://www.elizabethcullendunn.com/

NOV 2, 2016 SAVE THE DATE – CERAH Panel on Health Care in Danger

When healthcare is in danger, what can we do?”

Time:  Wednesday November 2, 18:30 – 20:30
Location: Medical Faculty UNIGE, Auditorium A250, avenue de Champel 9, 1206 Genève

Attacks on medical facilities in conflict zones have killed and injured countless patients and healthcare professionals in recent years, destroying infrastructures and depriving people of access to medical care.
Moderator Prof Doris SCHOPPER, Director of CERAH, medical doctor and professor at the Medical Faculty of Geneva University will ask representatives of ICRC, WHO and MSF, who are exposed in the field together with affected populations: When healthcare is in danger, what can we do?”

Panelists

  • Erin Kenney, Technical Officer, Stop Attacks on Health Care Workers, WHO
  • Marine Buissonière, Not A Target Senior Coordinator, MSF
  • Ali Naraghi, Head of the Health Care in Danger project, ICRC
Denunciating that medical facilities are #NotATarget, MSF will also present a short film and expose their expo booth in front of the auditorium.

Panel Discussion “When healthcare is in danger, what can we do?”