How well was HHErg represented at HEI Research Day 2019? Extremely well, thank you.

On March 14, McMaster's Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact hosted its annual Research Day. The HHErg was well represented this year with two poster presentations (below) and an oral presentation entitled, "Dying in the Margins:  Palliative Care,…

Missed our event in Geneva? Looking for a summary? Here it is.

  Have a look at a summary of the events that took place 26-27 September when the HHE Research Group visited Geneva. Thank you to our co-hosts CERAH, and to all of our participants over the two days and one…

HHE Representation at HSR2018, Liverpool

From 8-12 October the Fifth Global Symposium on Health Systems Research was held in Liverpool, UK. The HHE research group was well represented with a presentation on the Perceptions of Ebola Virus Disease Research project by Ani Chénier entitled "Beyond…

The Humanitarian Visual Landscape of 2015

by Sonya de Laat In this article that explores two themes that dominated the humanitarian visual landscape of 2015, the author invites readers to turn attention away from photographic content or form, and consider instead the medium of photography, the technology itself, as essentially and inherently shocking.

The Humanitarian Politics of Cecil the Lion

In case you missed it, in late July, Walter Palmer, a dentist from Minnesota, beheaded Cecil, a lion living in Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe. Indeed, the poaching of Cecil the lion was unfortunate. But the righteous expressions of moral high ground that accompanied media discussions lay bare some key issues around representations of Africa that warrant further attention. Public shaming of Mr. Palmer focused on outrage over his sense of Western entitlement that led him to disregard Zimbabwean laws to kill “Africa's most beloved lion”. Ironically, these selective narratives play into the same power dynamics and sense of entitlement that they set out to critique.

hhe members author ALNAP blog on palliative care in humanitarian crises

Elysée Nouvet and Lisa Schwartz co-authored a blog post for ALNAP on July 10, 2015 entitled: Is palliative care in humanitarian crises a luxury? If there is one thing the Ebola crisis has generated these past 18 months, it is…

An Outbreak of Outbreaks: Humanitarian Epidemiology in West Africa

Eritrea, northern Nigeria, and most recently Sierra Leone. Meningitis, lead poisoning and Ebola. My narrow experience of the three outbreaks—meningitis, lead poisoning and Ebola—demonstrates how poverty kills. Outbreaks flourish where there is insufficient investment in essential public health services, where poverty is the norm, where global neoliberalism sacrifices community health on the altar of free market capitalism.

HumEthNet Member Dr. Lynda Redwood-Campbell Comments on the Importance of Coordination in Disaster Response Action

“Coordination – that would be the big lesson of Haiti. Haiti was a disaster upon a disaster,” Canadian doctor Dr. Lynda Redwood-Campbell and HumEthNet member tells Globe and Mail reporter, Affan Chowdhry in a recent article about how past disasters will aid relief efforts in earthquake-ravaged Nepal. “There was a complete lack of coordination with foreign medical teams. Everybody and everybody’s cousin seemed to be there internationally. There was no good overarching coordination.”

On the Importance of Human Connection: Fear, Ebola and Security

Ebola preys upon our darkest imaginations—in part because it evokes otherness and its close companion, fear. Fear of Ebola is also linked to its mundaneness. Ebola can be transmitted via the ordinary, daily actions of offering affection or even by brief contact that involves the transmission of bodily fluids. Paradoxically, direct human connection both spreads the disease and is essential to its containment. Perhaps one of the most important lessons of the Ebola crisis is the absolute importance of human connection for security and as part of humanitarian response.