This team is tackling injustices in global health emergencies & humanitarian crises

Our key concerns were around how inequalities, vulnerabilities and various forms of injustices are often reinforced in these contexts, and how future public health responses could be better attuned to these issues.

Foundations – Gautham Krishnaraj

Foundations. Perspectives from a new Global Health Student and Humanitarian Health Care Ethics Research Group Trainee Gautham Krishnaraj, MSc Global Health Candidate (McMaster University) From Montreal… In September 2014, at the peak of the Ebola outbreak that inundated the minds…

From ‘suffering others’ to ‘aspiring mothers’: the contemporary image world of global maternal health campaigns

Maternal mortality was once described as the neglected tragedy of global health. Though it was estimated in the 1980s that nearly half a million women died each year from pregnancy and birth related causes – 99% of them in the global south – little attention was paid and little progress was made for many years. Recently, however, the problem of maternal mortality has become somewhat of a cause célèbre attracting the attention of world leaders, billionaire philanthropists, celebrity journalists, and filmmakers.

An Outbreak of Outbreaks: Humanitarian Epidemiology in West Africa

Eritrea, northern Nigeria, and most recently Sierra Leone. Meningitis, lead poisoning and Ebola. My narrow experience of the three outbreaks—meningitis, lead poisoning and Ebola—demonstrates how poverty kills. Outbreaks flourish where there is insufficient investment in essential public health services, where poverty is the norm, where global neoliberalism sacrifices community health on the altar of free market capitalism.