0 comments on “Missed our event in Geneva? Looking for a summary? Here it is.”

Missed our event in Geneva? Looking for a summary? Here it is.

 

Have a look at a summary of the events that took place 26-27 September when the HHE Research Group visited Geneva.

Thank you to our co-hosts CERAH, and to all of our participants over the two days and one evening of exciting activities.

 

DayPostcardFront

By all means, if you have thoughts you’d like to share with us about our ongoing research or the events from September in Geneva, please contact us!

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HHE Representation at HSR2018, Liverpool

From 8-12 October the Fifth Global Symposium on Health Systems Research was held in Liverpool, UK.

The HHE research group was well represented with a presentation on the Perceptions of Ebola Virus Disease Research project by Ani Chénier entitled “Beyond Triumphalist Discourses” and a poster on the Palliative Care in Humanitarian Crisis settings.

From the study on perceptions of EVD research:

The full citation of the presentation is:

Elysée Nouvet, Ani Chénier, Oumou Bah-Sow, John Pringle, Sékou Kouyaté, Sonya de Laat, Matthew Hunt, Carrie Bernard, Lynda Redwood-Campbell, Laurie Elit, Lisa Schwartz, Beyond triumphalist discourses: West African voices on the need to recognize and sustain national research capacity in the wake of the 2014-6 Ebola epidemic. Fifth Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, 8 12 October 2018,Liverpool, UK.

ABSTRACT:

BACKGROUND The 2014-6 West African Ebola epidemic, in which a neglected disease for which no effective treatment or vaccine was yet known claimed over 11,000 lives, was a stark reminder of the essential role that health research plays within health systems.

In 2016, we launched the “Perceptions and moral experiences of research conducted during the West Africa Ebola outbreak” study. This qualitative study seeks to better understand socially-situated practices and moral experiences of research conducted in public health crisis situations, and to deepen understanding of challenges to and strategies for the ethical conduct of research during public health emergencies. It explored, among other issues, the practical and ethical complexities of international research collaborations established during the outbreak.

METHODS We conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews with 108 stakeholders directly involved in research at trial sites in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. Participants included: 1- people having participated in clinical and persistence studies; 2- people engaged in the conduct of research (as investigators or research staff), 3- local and international research ethics board members; 4- governmental and civil society leaders. Most (91%) were from West African countries.

RESULTS Participants identified many strengths of research conducted during the outbreak, notably: 1) the success of some international partnerships (especially vaccine trials), 2) the development of innovative and adapted strategies for communicating with participants, 3) opportunities for capacity building, especially for first-time researchers, and 4) rigorous and constructive oversight by national research ethic boards.

Key challenges or failures included:  1) limited opportunities for higher-level engagement of affected-country researchers within international partnerships, 2) limited engagement of mid- or late-career researchers in the development or leadership of studies, 3) unequal access to and control over research materials like bio-samples, and 4) failures to sustainably invest in national research institutions.

CONCLUSIONS Our findings highlight the important role played by health research within local and national health systems, and complicate triumphalist discourses about the role of ‘capacity building’ in international research. During the 2014-6 West African Ebola outbreak, efforts towards capacity building were appreciated by many. Yet many also expressed frustration with the lack of investment in national research infrastructure and institutions, and the lack of opportunities for mid- and late-career researchers from affected countries. This had important practical implications, notably for the setting of research priorities that reflect needs and possibilities at the national level. Capacity must not only be built: it must also be recognized, supported, and sustained.

 From the study on palliative care in humanitarian crises:

Full reference for the poster:

de Laat, S., Matthew Hunt, Elysée Nouvet, Olive Wahoush, Kevin Bezanson, Carrie Bernard, Lynda Redwood-Campbell, Laurie Elit, Wejdan Khater, Oumou Bah Sow, Emmanuel Musoni, Rachel Yantzi, Ani Chénier , Lisa Schwartz, Dying in the Margins: Palliative Care, Humanitarian Crises and the Intersection of Global and Local Health Systems, Fifth Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, 8 12 October 2018, Liverpool, UK, Abstract ID: 3989

The poster is available below (& here as a PDF):

deLaat_ID3989_Poster_HSR2018_Final

Abstract:

OBJECTIVES There is no doubt that the primary goal of humanitarian healthcare has to be to save lives. Given the extremity of the crises in which humanitarians respond, not all lives can be saved. There is a growing acknowledgment of the role of palliative care in humanitarian healthcare. Here we present an interpretive description of the experience of palliative care in a variety of humanitarian crisis settings. Our objective is to map the diversity of those experiences and to examine the innovations and inconsistencies of global and local health systems to assess the obstacles and opportunities of these health systems in the support of palliative care during international humanitarian crises.

METHODS Four case studies were identified through stakeholder meetings and key informant interviews that represent a broad range of humanitarian emergency situations where palliative care needs arise:

  • A public health emergency: Guinea during the Ebola Crisis;
  • An acute conflict & refugee situation: Syrian refugees in Jordan;
  • A protracted refugee situation: Congolese and Burundian refugees in Rwanda; and,
  • Natural disaster situations: various geographic settings.

For each case study, in-depth, semi-structured interviews exploring experiences, needs, frustrations, and possibilities for palliative care were conducted with patients or family members of individuals with a terminal or life-threatening condition suited to palliative care. Along with interviews with crisis-affected people, local and international humanitarian healthcare providers were interviewed at each site.

RESULTS Global and local health systems—independently and intersecting with each other—emerged as a recurrent source of barriers to the provision of palliative care. Dominant themes include: global restrictions and local cultural anxieties to accessing essential medications for symptom relief; importance of culturally relevant, and locally informed, care and psychosocial support; the lack of international and local palliative care guidelines, training, and support for the provision of palliative care during international humanitarian crisis events. Changes to global health systems and improved interaction between local and international actors were cited as enablers to comprehensive palliative care provision. Palliative care was recognized as an essential component of holistic, comprehensive humanitarian healthcare, and should never act as a substitute to health system improvements for curative care.

DISCUSSION The alleviation of suffering is central to the work of humanitarian healthcare, and yet competing priorities often result in a lack of attention to palliative care. Our study presents critical insight onto the role of local and global health systems in the provision of palliative care in contexts of humanitarian crises.

 

0 comments on “Obstacles and moral experiences with palliative care provision in humanitarian crises…”

Obstacles and moral experiences with palliative care provision in humanitarian crises…

From September 17-19, Kevin Bezanson represented the Humanitarian Health Ethics research group at the 5th International Public Health and Palliative Care Conference held in Ottawa, ON.

Here is the PDF version of the poster entitled –

Health professionals’ lived experiences of palliative care provision in humanitarian crisis: Moral experiences confronting the suffering of patients who are dying or likely to die in settings of war, disaster, or epidemic.

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Kevin Bezanson presenting the HHE poster at the 5th International Public Health and Palliative Care Conference, Ottawa, ON, Sept. 17-19, 2017.

 

The poster is based on ongoing research for a R2HC funded project entitled:

Aid when there is ‘nothing left to offer’: A study of ethics and palliative care during international humanitarian action


The research project is funded by Elrha’s Research for Health in Humanitarian Crises (R2HC) Programme. The Research for Health in Humanitarian Crises (R2HC) programme aims to improve health outcomes by strengthening the evidence base for public health interventions in humanitarian crises. Visit www.elrha.org/work/r2hc for more information. The R2HC programme is funded equally by the Wellcome Trust and DFID, with Elrha overseeing the programme’s execution and management.
0 comments on “Hear Lisa Schwartz explain HHE’s project on palliative care in humanitarian contexts”

Hear Lisa Schwartz explain HHE’s project on palliative care in humanitarian contexts

From a new resource on Community of Practice for Integrated People Centred Palliative Care by WHO, info@integratedcare4people.org.

Additional interviews prepared by WHO’s Community of Practice for Integrated People Centred Palliative Care:

Interview of Dr Christian Ntizimira Médecin Head of Avocacy & Research department of Rwanda Palliative Care and Hospice Organization
Interview of Katherine Pettus, Advocacy Officer for Human Rights and Palliative Care at International Association for Hospice & Palliative
1 comment on “From Boston to Nepal: How to treat suffering without medical resources”

From Boston to Nepal: How to treat suffering without medical resources

One never gets used to the idea that there is nothing one can do.

–Connie Willis, The Doomsday Book, 1992

by Annekathryn Goodman, MD

I was deployed to Nepal for three weeks after the April 2015 Earthquake as part of a first responder mobile medical team of the International Medical Corps. My 12-person team was helicoptered into remote, inaccessible mountain villages that had been devastated by the earthquake. We would set up a clinic, treat acute injuries, collect data on impending infectious disease epidemics, and triage severely injured earthquake victims for helicopter evacuation to Kathmandu. It was during this journey that I was confronted with the dilemmas of how to care for actively dying people when resources were not available.

The challenges after a natural disaster are complex and nuanced.  There is a loss of civic infrastructure. Scarce resources include among others: medications, health facilities, and providers. There is also the terrible loss of family, food scarcity, and a lack of water and electricity.

The goals of first responders shift to acute care and includes saving lives, stabilizing injuries, and offering definitive therapy when possible. When a victim cannot survive, palliation of symptoms would be ideal if it is possible to do so. There is the tough business of triaging patients in this setting by whether or not they can be saved. The categories of triage range from immediate (immediate intervention will save the life), delayed (the injuries are not life threatening and can be treated later), minimal, and expectant. The expectant category is reserved for patients with devastating injuries where they will not survive or where the resources to help them are greater than what is available and even with the best care, their chance of pulling through is minimal.

In contrast to a disaster-restricted setting, tremendous expense is routinely spent for ill cancer patients in the hopes of giving them an extra 3 to 6 months of life. In addition, early palliative care intervention in a non-disaster setting hopes to improve symptoms, relieve suffering, and help patients with advanced and incurable cancers to transition in a gentler and more gradual way towards the inevitable end of their lives. During a mass casualty event, palliative care services directly compete with definitive or life-saving care. This leads to an altered standard of palliative care where pain-control and sedation is the main goal.

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Damage in the Basantpur Durbar Square. Photo from Wikipedia.

Nepal, a country of 31.5 million people where the average age is 22 years is an agrarian society and among the poorest countries in the world. Pre-earthquake, prescribing narcotics was illegal and palliative care was not a widely known medical concept. On 25 April 2015, a 7.8 earthquake rocked the country. A second 6.8 earthquake followed on 12 May. These earthquakes and the subsequent hundreds of severe aftershocks led to deaths, landslides, displacement, homelessness, and crop failure and food insecurity.

In this setting, my mobile medical unit treated over 2000 people during our three-week rotation. There were many cases of respiratory illness, dehydration, diarrheal diseases, pain, rashes, urinary symptoms, lacerations, fractures, pregnancy and gender based violence.

It was during one chaotic day that I met a 55-year-old gentleman whom I had to triage to the expectant category. I was in the middle of suturing a laceration when looking up I saw a group of people carrying a man down the mountainside in a large grain basket. Two years before, he had been treated in Kathmandu for bladder cancer and had undergone a pelvic exenteration, radiation, and chemotherapy. His family wanted him evacuated to Kathmandu. On examination there were multiple sites of tumor growing through the abdominal wall and he had developed a high output enterocutaneous fistula. His clothes were saturated by the fistulous output, and he was in obvious, tremendous pain. His family had been walking for two days to get to us.

It was an awful moment. I gently tried to explain through an interpreter that he probably would not last more than a few days and we could not send him to Kathmandu. His son and I bathed him and wrapped him in some chux pads that we had on hand. The family was incredulous and angry.

There are guidelines for the ethical approach to allocation of scarce resources and triage. The concepts to consider include accountability, transparency, consistency, and proportionality. There is the issue of fairness—to be inherently just to all people. And there is the public health concept of the duty to obtain the best outcome for the greatest number of patients with available resources. These issues confronted me with this poor gentleman and his family. I could not even offer adequate palliation of his and his family’s suffering.

I will always remember this patient and I bring back to our resource rich country some important concepts to consider in our care of cancer patients. The inability to give good care and alleviate suffering leads to moral distress among the providers. There is a balance of care and we must be thoughtful with treatment choices. On the one hand, we can cause harm with overly aggressive care that may be futile. In addition, beyond the individual patient, the inappropriate use of health care resources harms others who may not be able to receive care. However, the inability to at least manage symptoms is unacceptable.

AK_Nepal
Caption: “I am inspired by how children cope in disasters,
they are so resilient:
Laughing, figuring out how to make play out of the rubble and destruction.
So in that scene, I pulled out my notebook and asked them to draw pictures for me.
They loved it.
Got lots of drawings.
And then they loved looking at each other’s drawings.
There was lots of feedback and analysis all in Nepali.
And they loved leaning over and poking at me:
Lots of dirty fingers in my ears.”

There is a movement to develop a crisis standard of care during disasters. These standards are also worthy of consideration in a non-disaster situation. Critical resources go to those who will benefit the most. We must prevent hoarding and overuse of limited resources. Limited resources must be conserved so more people can get the care they need. We must minimize discrimination against vulnerable groups who cannot advocate for themselves such as the poor, the minorities, the elderly, and immigrants.

Ultimately, regardless of the context we must maintain the basic human values of compassion, empathy, and respect for the dignity of others and to maintain professional codes of conduct.

Dr. Annekathryn Goodman is a Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology at Harvard Medical School and practices as a gynecologic oncologist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. She is a member of the national Trauma and Critical Care Team  a branch of the US department of Health and Human Services and has deployed to various international disasters including Bam, Iran 2004, Banda Aceh 2005, Haiti 2010, the Philippines 2014, and Nepal 2015.  Since 2008, she has been consulting in Bangladesh on cervical cancer prevention and the development of medical infrastructure to care for women with gynecologic cancers. 

1 comment on “Palliative Care in Humanitarian Crises – James Smith & Tammam Aloudat”

Palliative Care in Humanitarian Crises – James Smith & Tammam Aloudat

James Smith* and Tammam Aloudat**

*UREPH, MSF OCG,

**Medical Department, MSF OCG

James.smith@geneva.msf.org

 

Medical humanitarian organizations don’t generally deal well with death. This may come as a surprise, since it’s a sombre reality of this line of work that frontline staff are often witness to death and dying. Contrary to the humanitarian’s general propensity for self-aggrandizement, it’s not always possible to save lives. So what then of the oft-cited dual imperative to alleviate suffering and preserve dignity?

The evolution of the global HIV / AIDS epidemic during the 1990s, and more recently the 2013-16 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, prompted humanitarian actors to reconsider the role of palliative care in their programmes. During the height of both crises, health actors were pressured by a combination of highly virulent pathogens, inaccessible or non-existent treatment, the sheer number of affected patients, and subsequently very high mortality rates, to reconsider their modus operandi.

In 10 Years of Antiretrovirals MSF acknowledged that, in the absence of affordable anti-retroviral treatment, the organization chose to focus on prevention, palliative care, and the treatment of opportunistic illnesses in Malawi. The more recent Pushed to the Limit and Beyond report detailed MSF’s response to the West African Ebola outbreak. In the following extract Crestani, MSF’s Ebola Task Force Coordinator, offers a harrowing insight into the challenges faced by treatment teams in Monrovia during the summer of 2014:

“We had two choices – let those in who were earlier in the disease, or take in those were who dying and the most infectious … We could only offer very basic palliative care and there were so many patients and so few staff that the staff had on average only one minute per patient.”

In addition to very high mortality situations such as the Ebola and HIV crises, much of MSF’s medical humanitarian work still focuses on common diseases in very low resource health settings. Medical care delivered in hospitals in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or South Sudan, or clinics in Iraq or Syria, may save many lives. However, without the necessary resources and organizational and political prioritization, we continue to lose many patients to injuries and common diseases in these settings. In such cases, little may be done to alleviate the pain and suffering, and optimize end of life care, of those who cannot be treated. Advanced cancers, COPD, and congestive cardiac failure are difficult to treat and have yet to be addressed with necessarily broad management plans that capture the importance of end of life care.


Reflection 1: A Reluctant Acceptance of Limitations of Care

James Orbinski famously referred to MSF’s ‘ethics of refusal’ in the organisation’s 1999 Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. But what does this mean at the level of the clinical encounter? Clinicians often persist in their provision of care with curative intent, particularly when treating patients whose conditions are familiar to MSF: consider severe malnutrition and severe malaria, for example. The practice of humanitarian medicine in low resource settings is a continuous struggle between the desire to do better for individual patients, and recognition of a multitude of limitations, which often remain beyond the immediate control of medical personnel. It is imperative that this struggle does not impede the physician’s ability to make the most appropriate clinical decisions for individual patients.


Palliative care is now acknowledged as a central pillar of any comprehensive health system. This is clearly no different in the context of a humanitarian crisis. However, despite recognition that palliative care is routinely practised in many of our programmes, a dearth of evidence and guidance exists to support frontline staff and decision makers. There is no mention of palliative care in the Sphere handbook, and comprehensive reference to pain relief and palliative care is virtually non-existent in most of the publicly available guidelines published by leading medical humanitarian organizations.

How is it that palliative care has been so neglected by the humanitarian sector?

Utilitarianism’s Disregard of the Dying

Humanitarian crises exist where population needs exceed the existing capacity to respond. In situations where overwhelming needs cannot be met in full, difficult decisions must be made. In such circumstances, medical staff are often prompted to adopt a utilitarian approach: the greatest good must be achieved for the greatest number of people. Others adopt a different approach, and seek to intervene with a narrower focus.

Irrespective of the chosen framework, implicit in much of this decision-making is the overarching aim of saving lives. Consider, for example, the way in which crude mortality rates (CMR) and under 5 mortality rates (U5MR) are used to determine success or failure in crisis response. The preservation of life takes priority over other outcome measures.  To palliate becomes tantamount to failure. This is reinforced by a system of humanitarian financing that focuses on outputs and demonstrable outcomes, often of the material kind.

The intention of saving lives is clearly a priority in such circumstances where lives can be saved. However, there is an urgent need to address gaps in our understanding and practice of end of life care where curative and lifesaving interventions fall short. We have identified the treatment of patients with HIV, TB, and complex non-communicable diseases, the victims of trauma and violence, paediatric patients with life-threatening congenital, genetic, and other conditions, and the effective management of pain, as priority issues.

Palliation: Reiterating an Intrinsic Good

The alleviation of suffering is clearly a moral good, as Lisa Fuller explains in Many Missions, One Voice (2003),

‘Demonstrating compassion for people and to alleviating their immediate suffering … are good in themselves, and so need not be evaluated primarily in terms of their good consequences.’

With this in mind, resources should be allocated to improve palliative care programming in MSF projects. Such resources should include the sensitization and training of staff, the development and application of norms and protocols for palliative care, and targeted work to ensure sustained access to tools and medicines, including advocacy to tackle regulatory barriers that prevent the importation and use of opioids in certain countries.


Reflection 2: The Perception of Pain

Pain management, particularly related to the use of opioids, is not consistently practised in MSF projects. There are several reasons for this, including regulatory limitations and a lack of confidence in opioid use by physicians and nursing staff. This is further exacerbated by judgements made on the severity of pain, particularly when dealing with paediatric patients. As an example, we recently asked national staff physicians about their perception of pain in young children in the intensive care unit of a large malnutrition hospital. In a second round, we asked the same question of mothers of the same children. The mothers consistently evaluated the pain to be more severe than the physician estimates. None of the children in question were receiving opioid pain relief despite some suffering from severe cases of malnutrition, malaria, and pneumonia. The reasons cited by physicians for not using opioids include legal issues, lack of training and experience, and the absence of naloxone in some settings.


MSF has an established track record of programmatic and advocacy interventions intended to redress inequity in global health. It is time that we asked serious questions of the neglect of palliative care and pain management in the places we work. Where next from here? As with others in the humanitarian community, we eagerly await further details of the ‘Aid when there is “nothing left to offer” study. In the meantime, MSF is in the process of developing the organization’s first paediatric palliative guidelines, which we hope will shed more light on this important topic.