0 comments on “New WHO guidelines on ethical issues in public health surveillance”

New WHO guidelines on ethical issues in public health surveillance

From our colleagues at the World Health Organization:

Nuevas pautas de OMS sobre ética en la vigilancia de salud pública

Estas pautas, recientemente publicadas por OMS, constituyen el primer marco internacional para dar orientación ética en los temas de vigilancia en salud pública. Están disponibles (en inglés) en:http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/255721/1/9789241512657-eng.pdf?ua=1

Para recibir más información y recursos sobre ética de la salud pública, suscríbase a la lista de OPS dedicada al tema usando el siguiente enlace:  http://listserv.paho.org/scripts/wa.exe?SUBED1=PUBLICHEALTHETHICS&A=1

 

New WHO guidelines on ethical issues in public health surveillance

These guidelines, recently published by WHO, are the first international framework to provide ethics guidance on issues in public health surveillance. They are available at:http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/255721/1/9789241512657-eng.pdf?ua=1

To receive more information and resources about public health ethics, subscribe to PAHO’s list devoted to the topic using the following link: http://listserv.paho.org/scripts/wa.exe?SUBED1=PUBLICHEALTHETHICS&A=1

0 comments on “Geneva & Back Again – Julia Pemberton’s Reflections on Interning at the WHO”

Geneva & Back Again – Julia Pemberton’s Reflections on Interning at the WHO

Julia Pemberton, PhD candidate
Health Research Methodology Program, Field of Interest: Global Health
pemberj@mcmaster.ca

img_8967This past summer I had the incredible opportunity to join the World Health Organization (WHO) as a Research Intern for three months. At WHO I joined the Global Health Ethics Unit, which is part of the larger Research, Ethics, Knowledge Management Department. The majority of my internship focused on the creation and execution of a qualitative descriptive research study. Entitled “Ethical Issues Associated with Implementation Research: A Descriptive Qualitative Analysis of the WHO Experience from 2005-2015,” this study consists of a document analysis followed by two focus group sessions, one with WHO Technical Officers, and one with past and present WHO Ethics Research Committee (ERC) members. The purpose of this study is to identify and understand the ethical issues identified by the WHO ERC in its review of  Implementation Research (IR) projects submitted for ethical review at WHO. The results from this study will be used to raise awareness on the ethical issues arising in IR and to build capacity of researchers and ethics committees involved in the conduct and review of IR, respectively. The results will also potentially be used to inform a global guidance document on ethical review of IR. In addition to this research project I also was a member of the WHO Intern Board as an Intern Advocate, where I helped connect interns with WHO staff to engage in professional development and networking opportunities. Finally, I was also responsible for the creation of an Intern Alumni platform for the Global Health Ethics Unit, as well as the Global Health Ethics newsletter. In summary, I used my time in Geneva to expand my professional network, and had productive meetings with the International Committee of the Red Cross, Médecins sans frontières, the Council on Health Research and Development (COHRED), and the Geneva Centre for Education and Research in Humanitarian Action (CERAH).

The research activities described above directly relate to my doctoral work. The topic of my dissertation is global health research governance. Governance, or the way political, ethical, administrative, and financial authority applies to a health research system, is an important part

of how these systems are organized and managed, and how they perform. The purpose of my doctoral thesis is to examine how global health research governance is being understood, developed and currently used in the Canadian national health research system. Briefly, my thesis will generate an inductively derived, reflexive, global health research governance model for Canada. Through this work I intend to identify specific value criteria that are indicative of good global health research governance. Foregrounded will be the contribution of global health research ethics to governance beyond research ethics review, and discerning how values are known and reflected in the governance of national health research systems. Once this model of Canadian global health research governance is known, I will be conducting a case study of a global health research partnership (Canada and Zambia) to determine the current reflexivity of the Canadian model and determine what, if any, recommendations for policy and health systems strengthening could be made.

Julia Pemberton is a 3rd year student in the Health Research Methodology PhD at McMaster University, a CIHR Banting & Best Canadian Graduate Scholar, and a recipient of both the CIHR Douglas Kinsella Award in Bioethics and the CIHR Michael Smith Foreign Study Supplement Award.

0 comments on “An Outbreak of Outbreaks: Humanitarian Epidemiology in West Africa”

An Outbreak of Outbreaks: Humanitarian Epidemiology in West Africa

by John Pringle

I was disappointed that I couldn’t go to West Africa sooner. The Ebola epidemic was at its peak in the fall of 2014, the same time that I was preparing for my doctoral defence. I watched “Ebola Frontline” which conveyed tragedy and urgency. The documentary followed Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) doctor Javid Abdelmoneim as he cared for Ebola patients in Sierra Leone.[1] It was graphic and raw, something out of Dafoe’s A Journal of the Plague Year. That people had to be turned away from Ebola treatment centres was profoundly inhumane. That traumatized aid workers had to turn people away because treatment centres were overrun, to watch helplessly as people died agonizing deaths in cars or on the ground—was yet another searing reminder of our collective failure, that there is no shared responsibility for global health, and that our notion of ‘international community’ is more dream than reality.

0 comments on “HumEthNet Member Dr. Lynda Redwood-Campbell Comments on the Importance of Coordination in Disaster Response Action”

HumEthNet Member Dr. Lynda Redwood-Campbell Comments on the Importance of Coordination in Disaster Response Action

“Coordination – that would be the big lesson of Haiti. Haiti was a disaster upon a disaster,” Canadian doctor Dr. Lynda Redwood-Campbell and HumEthNet member tells Globe and Mail reporter, Affan Chowdhry in a recent article about How past disasters will aid relief efforts in earthquake-ravaged Nepal. “There was a complete lack of coordination with foreign medical teams. Everybody and everybody’s cousin seemed to be there internationally. There was no good overarching coordination.”

0 comments on “On the Importance of Human Connection: Fear, Ebola and Security”

On the Importance of Human Connection: Fear, Ebola and Security

Photo of Larissa Fast

by Larissa Fast

Cross-posted with Political Violence @ a Glance

This week marks the first anniversary of the World Health Organization (WHO) declaration of an Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa. A healthcare worker infected with Ebola while volunteering in Sierra Leone arrived in the US earlier this month. Another ten of this unnamed health worker’s colleagues were also evacuated to the US for monitoring after exposure to the virus.

The muted media reaction to this latest Ebola case is vastly different than last fall, when the outbreak was at its peak and the first case of Ebola arrived on North American shores. Hysteria mounted, tweets mentioning Ebola skyrocketed, and pictures of people in clinics and in western airports wearing various types of protective gear appeared in the media.

0 comments on “Health Care Under Attack: A Call for Action”

Health Care Under Attack: A Call for Action

Attacks on healthcare workers and facilities are increasing, in both conflict and non-conflict settings. The targeting of healthcare workers and facilities has grave consequences for the delivery of care and the right to health in such settings. Join a live-streaming event on Wednesday, 21 May 2014