0 comments on “This team is tackling injustices in global health emergencies & humanitarian crises”

This team is tackling injustices in global health emergencies & humanitarian crises

A little over a year ago, several researchers working on ethical and justice based questions arising in global health emergencies (health crises of global concern) and in other humanitarian crises came together on a Wellcome Trust funded project entitled:  “Vulnerability and Justice in Global Health Emergency Regulation: Developing Future Ethical Models.”  Our key concerns were around how inequalities, vulnerabilities and various forms of injustices are often reinforced in these contexts, and how future public health responses could be better attuned to these issues.

We are delighted to announce that we recently launched our website “Justice in Global Health Emergencies & Humanitarian Crises”.

On this platform, we’re aiming to explore issues around vulnerability and justice during global health emergencies and humanitarian crises through a range of media:

  • Short animations that explain concepts that are central to our project, such as structural injustice, epistemic injustice, the importance of denaturalising disasters, among others.
  • Blog-like applied illustrations of the relevance of central concepts in real-world scenarios and examples.
  • A podcast, “Just Emergencies”, where we sit down with humanitarian workers and researchers to talk about their work and interests.
  • A series of invited blog posts, which capture the knowledge and experiences of a diverse range of people who share with us the pressing issues of working in the global health and humanitarian sectors.
  • A developing section dedicated to modelling for global health emergencies in the future.
  • A list of articles, books and websites that might be of use to those researching, teaching or generally interested in these topics.

We’re hoping that this website is a useful resource to academics, humanitarian workers, students, and the interested public alike. Ideally, we would like this to develop into a platform where researchers and humanitarian actors can engage with these topics and in dialogue with us.

If you are willing to share your thoughts and experience as practitioners or researcher in the form of a blog post, or would like to talk about your global health emergency or humanitarian crises experience on the podcast, please get in touch at ghe@ed.ac.uk.

New content will be posted on a regular basis, so we warmly invite you to sign up to our newsletter. You can also follow us on twitter (@GanguliMitra)

0 comments on “How well was HHErg represented at HEI Research Day 2019? Extremely well, thank you.”

How well was HHErg represented at HEI Research Day 2019? Extremely well, thank you.

On March 14, McMaster’s Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact hosted its annual Research Day.

The HHErg was well represented this year with two poster presentations (below) and an oral presentation entitled, “Dying in the Margins:  Palliative Care, Humanitarian Crises and the Intersection of Global and Local Health Systems.”

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Pictured from L to R, Jhalok Talukdar, Rachel Yantzi, and Takhliq Amir.

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Downloadable PDF of the Natural Disasters Array poster.

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Downloadable PDF of the Opportunities and Challenges poster.

 

 

0 comments on “Reflection 7(1) is ready for you to read.”

Reflection 7(1) is ready for you to read.

Follow the link for online reading of Reflections 7(1)..

This edition of the HumEthNet newsletter looks at picturing humanitarian health ethics and two important new studies of perceptions & experiences of people often the subjects of aid campaigns.

Thank you to our contributors, Philippe Calain (MSF-Suisse & HumEthNet member), Siobhan Warrington of Oral Testimony, and David Girling from the University of East Anglia.

0 comments on “Can a Television Change Perceptions of Ebola?”

Can a Television Change Perceptions of Ebola?

13942782618113Fear and dread of Ebola is shared by patients, healthcare providers and the general public. Some of this fear comes from a lack of understanding of how the disease is experienced combatted. Follow this link to read a commentary by HHERG’s Sonya de Laat, Postdoctoral Fellow in Humanitarian Health Ethics at McMaster University, on the role of a television set in contributing to a change in perception about Ebola Virus Disease.

Television and Ebola. How televisions can change disease perception & reduce stigma

 

 

 

0 comments on “Cultural history of the flu: reducing the stigma of Ebola.”

Cultural history of the flu: reducing the stigma of Ebola.

Follow the link for a blog post by HHERG’s Sonya de Laat, Postdoctoral Fellow in Humanitarian Health Ethics at McMaster University.

How can cultural history of ‘health’ change disease perception & reduce stigmaA brief comparison of Influenza, 1918-1919, and Ebola, 2014-2015

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0 comments on “Have Content to Share on Post-Research Ethics Analysis? Here’s a CfP for you!”

Have Content to Share on Post-Research Ethics Analysis? Here’s a CfP for you!

PREA: Call for Abstracts

Abstracts are now being accepted for paper and poster presentations at an International Conference on Ethics & Humanitarian Research.

The conference is organised jointly by the PREA Research Team and The Ohio State University (OSU).

The conference takes place 25-26 March 2019 at OSU in Columbus, Ohio, USA.

Confirmed Speakers

Others will be added as confirmations are received.

More about the conference:

The Post-Research Ethics Analysis (PREA) project is funded by r2hc to address ethical issues in humanitarian research.

One output is a practical tool to facilitate reflection on and learning from ethical issues arising during humanitarian research. The tool will be launched at the conference, along with keynote lectures, accepted paper and poster presentations, and structured conversations between humanitarian researchers and ethicists.

Abstracts deadline: 31 December 2018.

The PREA project also has an open call for submissions of Case Studies in the Ethics of Humanitarian Research: http://www.preaportal.org/case-studies/

If you have specific questions about the Conference, please email info@preaportal.org.

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0 comments on “Upcoming abstract deadlines.”

Upcoming abstract deadlines.

Don’t miss you chance to submit abstracts for the following events:

 

 

  • November 23: Canadian Bioethics Congress (CBS), Banff, Alberta, Canada, 22-24 May 2019.